ORDER OF DEACONS

a wellspring of spiritual sustenance 

Parables for the Daily Office

Parables for the Daily Office
for the Edification of the Laity

The Parables for the Daily Office is a collection of parables from the Class A texts, primarily Liber Cordis Cencti Seprente. These are for use for the edification of the laity and yet the Diaconate is encouraged to meditate on the parables at great length during Vespers or even Compline. 

Parable Text Source Notes
Parable 1     The Parable of the Light and Colors
  Adonai spake unto V.V.V.V.V., saying: There must ever be division in the word. For the colours are many, but the light is one. Therefore thou writest that which is of mother of emerald, and of lapis-lazuli, and of turquoise, and of alexandrite. Another writeth the words of topaz, and of deep amethyst, and of gray sapphire, and of deep sapphire with a tinge as of blood. Therefore do ye fret yourselves because of this. Be not contented with the image. I who am the Image of an Image say this. Debate not of the image, saying Beyond! Beyond! One mounteth unto the Crown by the moon and by the Sun, and by the arrow, and by the Foundation, and by the dark home of the stars from the black earth. Not otherwise may ye reach unto the Smooth Point. Cor 1.2-10  
Parable 2     The Parable of the Petal of Amaranth
  Thou seest yon petal of amaranth, blown by the wind from the low sweet brows of Hathor? (The Magister saw it and rejoiced in the beauty of it.) Listen! (From a certain world came an infinite wail.) That falling petal seemed to the little ones a wave to engulph their continent. So they will reproach thy servant, saying: Who hath sent thee to save us? He will be sore distressed. Cor 1.34-38  
Parable 3     The Parable of the Maiden and Hades
(The Parable of New Birth)
  There was a maiden that strayed among the corn, and sighed; then grew a new birth, a narcissus, and therein she forgot her sighing and her loneliness. Even instantly rode Hades heavily upon her, and ravished her away. (Then the scribe knew the narcissus in his heart; but because it came not to his lips, therefore was he shamed and spake no more.) Co 1.47-49  
Parable 4     The Parable of the Maiden and Hades
  Adonai spake yet again with V.V.V.V.V. and said: The earth is ripe for vintage; let us eat of her grapes, and be drunken thereon. And V.V.V.V.V. answered and said: O my lord, my dove, my excellent one, how shall this word seem unto the children of men?And He answered him: Not as thou canst see. It is certain that every letter of this cipher hath some value; but who shall determine the value? For it varieth ever, according to the subtlety of Him that made it. And He answered Him: Have I not the key thereof? I am clothed with the body of flesh; I am one with the Eternal and Omnipotent God. Then said Adonai: Thou hast the Head of the Hawk, and thy Phallus is the Phallus of Asar. Thou knowest the white, and thou knowest the black, and thou knowest that these are one. But why seekest thou the knowledge of their equivalence?And he said: That my Work may be right. And Adonai said: The strong brown reaper swept his swathe and rejoiced. The wise man counted his muscles, and pondered, and understood not, and was sad. Reap thou, and rejoice! Cor 1.50-56  
Parable 5     The Parable of the Pale Image
  Moreover I beheld a vision of a river. There was a little boat thereon; and in it under purple sails was a golden woman, an image of Asi wrought in finest gold. Also the river was of blood, and the boat of shining steel. Then I loved her; and, loosing my girdle, cast myself into the stream. I gathered myself into the little boat, and for many days and nights did I love her, burning beautiful incense before her. Yea! I gave her of the flower of my youth. But she stirred not; only by my kisses I defiled her so that she turned to blackness before me. Yet I worshipped her, and gave her of the flower of my youth. Also it came to pass, that thereby she sickened, and corrupted before me. Almost I cast myself into the stream. Then at the end appointed her body was whiter than the milk of the stars, and her lips red and warm as the sunset, and her life of a white heat like the heat of the midmost sun. Then rose she up from the abyss of Ages of Sleep, and her body embraced me. Altogether I melted into her beauty and was glad. The river also became the river of Amrit, and the little boat was the chariot of the flesh, and the sails thereof the blood of the heart that beareth me, that beareth me. O serpent woman of the stars! I, even I, have fashioned Thee from a pale image of fine gold. Cor 2.7.16  
Parable 6     The Parable of the White Swan of Ecstasy and the Little Crazy Boy of Reason
  Also the Holy One came upon me, and I beheld a white swan floating in the blue. Between its wings I sate, and the æons fled away. Then the swan flew and dived and soared, yet no whither we went. A little crazy boy that rode with me spake unto the swan, and said: Who art thou that dost float and fly and dive and soar in the inane? Behold, these many æons have passed; whence camest thou? Whither wilt thou go? And laughing I chid him, saying: No whence! No whither! The swan being silent, he answered: Then, if with no goal, why this eternal journey? And I laid my head against the Head of the Swan, and laughed, saying: Is there not joy ineffable in this aimless winging? Is there not weariness and impatience for who would attain to some goal? And the swan was ever silent. Ah! but we floated in the infinite Abyss. Joy! Joy! White swan, bear thou ever me up between thy wings! Cor 2.17-25  
Parable 7     The Parable of the Dolphin and the Harper
  Behold! the Abyss of the Great Deep. Therein is a mighty dolphin, lashing his sides with the force of the waves. There is also an harper of gold, playing infinite tunes. Then the dolphin delighted therein, and put off his body, and became a bird. The harper also laid aside his harp, and played infinite tunes upon the Pan-pipe. Then the bird desired exceedingly this bliss, and laying down its wings became a faun of the forest. The harper also laid down his Pan-pipe, and with the human voice sang his infinite tunes. Then the faun was enraptured, and followed far; at last the harper was silent, and the faun became Pan in the midst of the primal forest of Eternity. Thou canst not charm the dolphin with silence, O my prophet! Cor 2.37-44  
Parable 8     The Parable of the Mountain
  The prophet cried against the mountain; come thou hither, that I may speak with thee! The mountain stirred not. Therefore went the prophet unto the mountain, and spake unto it. But the feet of the prophet were weary, and the mountain heard not his voice. But I have called unto Thee, and I have journeyed unto Thee, and it availed me not. I waited patiently, and Thou wast with me from the beginning. Cor 2.57-60  
Parable 9     The Parable of the Waters, the Priest, and the Pyramid
  Also I heard the voice of Adonai the Lord the desirable one concerning that which is beyond. Let not the dwellers in Thebai and the temples thereof prate ever of the Pillars of Hercules and the Ocean of the West. Is not the Nile a beautiful water?Let not the priest of Isis uncover the nakedness of Nuit, for every step is a death and a birth.The priest of Isis lifted the veil of Isis, and was slain by the kisses of her mouth. Then was he the priest of Nuit, and drank of the milk of the stars. Let not the failure and the pain turn aside the worshippers. The foundations of the pyramid were hewn in the living rock ere sunset; did the king weep at dawn that the crown of the pyramid was yet unquarried in the distant land? Cor 5.48-51  
Parable 10     The Parable of the Hummingbird
  Then the humming-bird was afflicted in his spirit, and he flew unto the flowers, and it was as if naught had been spoken between them. Yet in a little while a serpent struck him that he died. Cor 5.54  
Parable 11     The Parable of the House of Happiness
  Children of Earth! rejoice! rejoice exceedingly; for your salvation is at hand. The end of sorrow is come; I will ravish you away into mine unutterable joy. I will kiss you, and bring you to the bridal: I will spread a feast before you in the house of happiness. I am not come to rebuke you, or to enslave you. I bid you not turn from your voluptuous ways, from your idleness, from your follies. But I bring you joy to your pleasure, peace to your languor, wisdom to your folly. All that ye do is right, if so be that ye enjoy it. I am come against sorrow, against weariness, against them that seek to enslave you. I pour you lustral wine, that giveth you delight both at the sunset and the dawn. Come with me, and I will give you all that is desirable upon the earth. Because I give you that of which Earth and its joys are but as shadows. They flee away, but my joy abideth even unto the end. Tza 1.3-14